Housing and health partnership gives extra independence

August 10, 2015 Written by Sam Brown

Two of our associate community matrons are working alongside assisted living homes across the city, as part of an innovative year-long pilot scheme – the first of its kind for Bristol.
The new service will explore the benefits of providing community healthcare on site in the ‘extra care’ homes, to help older people stay out of hospital and enjoy their independence for as long as possible.
Associate Community Matrons Jacqueline Sykes, and Emma Tovey are working in partnership with Brunel Care and Housing and Care 21 to run the pilot until January 2016.
Jacqueline says: “We’re really excited to start this work – it’s wonderful to see the difference it makes to the residents. Patients tell us that they want healthcare in their homes or in their community, they don’t want to go to hospital. This sort of innovative scheme helps to achieve just that. The pilot is being independently evaluated by Capita with support from Avon Primary Care Research Collaborative, so that we can really understand the difference it makes.”

“Patients tell us that they want healthcare in their homes or in their community, they don’t want to go to hospital. This sort of innovative scheme helps to achieve just that.”

Mrs Mary Dougherty, a resident from Waverley Gardens, an assisted living development in Bishopsworth, said: “Jackie is very helpful. I’ve had a rough time lately being very unwell, but she comes in every couple of days to help me and give me advice.”
The work forms part of a package of services funded by Bristol CCG which are designed to improve the health and wellbeing of Bristol’s frail and complex older people. Alongside the housing and health partnership, strength and balance classes are running across the city. These provide targeted physiotherapy group exercise and education for adults at risk of falls, to increase confidence and independence, and help prevent further falls.

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